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PORI JAZZ 2018

Selailu 39 tuotteet
Image Soul Side of Town
‘Tower of Power, the ten-piece soul-jazz outfit from Oakland, California play as tight as a chain-link fence, with not a weak link in sight. There's something in the band's DNA that makes the toughest, tightest arrangements flow with deceptive ease - the synchronization is impeccable; their feel for the soul and funk traditions is continually refreshed and revitalized.’ – London Jazz News

19,95 €
Image Soul Side of Town (2 LP)
45,50 €
Image The East Bay Archive
19,95 €
Image Great American Soulbook
19,95 €
Image Oakland Zone
19,95 €
Image 40th Anniversary (CD + DVD)
23,50 €
Image Far From Over (2 LP)
Keyboardist-composer Vijay Iyer’s energized sequence of ECM releases has garnered copious international praise. Yet his fifth for the label since 2014 – Far From Over, featuring his dynamically commanding sextet – finds Iyer reaching a new peak, furthering an artistry that led The Guardian to call him “one of the world’s most inventive new-generation jazz pianists” and The New Yorker to describe him as “extravagantly gifted… brilliantly eclectic.” Far From Over features this sextet of virtuoso improvisers – with horn players Graham Haynes, Steve Lehman and Mark Shim alongside rhythm partners Stephan Crump and Tyshawn Sorey – leveraging a wealth of jazz history even as it pushes boldly forward. The music ranges from the thrillingly explosive (“Down to the Wire,” “Good on the Ground”) to the cathartically elegiac (“For Amiri Baraka,” “Threnody”), with melodic hooks, entrancing atmosphere, rhythmic muscle and an elemental spirit all part of the allure. “This group has a lot of fire in it, but also a lot of earth, because the tones are so deep, the timbres and textures,” Iyer says. “There’s also air and water – the music moves.”

33,95 €
Image Far From Over
Keyboardist-composer Vijay Iyer’s energized sequence of ECM releases has garnered copious international praise. Yet his fifth for the label since 2014 – Far From Over, featuring his dynamically commanding sextet – finds Iyer reaching a new peak, furthering an artistry that led The Guardian to call him “one of the world’s most inventive new-generation jazz pianists” and The New Yorker to describe him as “extravagantly gifted… brilliantly eclectic.” Far From Over features this sextet of virtuoso improvisers – with horn players Graham Haynes, Steve Lehman and Mark Shim alongside rhythm partners Stephan Crump and Tyshawn Sorey – leveraging a wealth of jazz history even as it pushes boldly forward. The music ranges from the thrillingly explosive (“Down to the Wire,” “Good on the Ground”) to the cathartically elegiac (“For Amiri Baraka,” “Threnody”), with melodic hooks, entrancing atmosphere, rhythmic muscle and an elemental spirit all part of the allure. “This group has a lot of fire in it, but also a lot of earth, because the tones are so deep, the timbres and textures,” Iyer says. “There’s also air and water – the music moves.”

19,95 €
Image a cosmic rhythm with each stroke
Vijay Iyer: piano, Fender Rhodes piano, electronics
Wadada Leo Smith: trumpet

A cosmic rhythm with each stroke features Vijay Iyer and his "hero, friend and teacher", Wadada Leo Smith. Vijay previously played extensively with Wadada in the trumpeter's Golden Quartet. As he recalls in the liner notes here, "That group's broad palette included 'pure' tones and distorted sound, motion and stillness, melody and noise. In quartet performances, Wadada and I often became a unit within the unit generating spontaneous duo episodes as formal links. In the process, a space of possibility emerged that introduced me to other systems of music-making. We have continued this approach in recent years..." A particularly inspiring collaboration at New York's The Stone early in 2015 underlined the affinity of their sounds and concepts and made the documentation of the duo a priority. Hence this album, produced by Manfred Eicher at New York's Avatar Studios in October 2015, which captures the improvisational magic of the duo, the expressive individuality of the participants and the ways in which they can - as Wadada Leo Smith says - "merge as a single wave, or a single voice."


19,95 €
Image Break Stuff (2 LP)
Vijay Iyer: piano
Stephan Crump: double bass
Marcus Gilmore: drums

Break Stuff features Vijay Iyer's long-running and widely-acclaimed trio with bassist Stephan Crump and drummer Marcus Gilmore, a band in existence for eleven years now. "We keep learning from each other and from experiences and try to set challenges for ourselves so that growth is part of the equation." It's a group whose musical language is informed by more than the jazz piano trio tradition. While Iyer acknowledges the influence of, for instance, Ahmad Jamal, Andrew Hill and Duke Ellington's Money Jungle album (with Charles Mingus and Max Roach) upon his own trio aesthetics, he points out that his group has also been inspired by "James Brown's rhythm section, Hendrix's Band of Gypsys, Miles Davis's rhythm section, Charlie Parker's rhythm section, soul music from the 1970s, electronic music and hip-hop from very recent times..." The list goes on. The piece "Hood" on the new recording is a tribute to Detroit minimal techno producer and DJ Robert Hood. "He did all this really interesting music with numerical patterning - different rhythms unfolding through each other, but still in a very clear dance music framework, very textural and sound-oriented. You hear the evolution of timbre. It became a point of reference for us, to see if we could capture some of that spirit in a purely acoustic framework."




33,95 €
Image Break Stuff
Vijay Iyer Trio:
Vijay Iyer, piano
Stephan Crump, double bass
Marcus Gilmore, drums


"Break Stuff" is what happens after formal elements have been addressed. Vijay Iyer calls the break "a span of time in which to act. It's the basis for breakdowns, breakbeats, and break dancing... it can be the moment when everything comes to life." A number of the pieces here are breakdowns of other Iyer constructions. Some are from a suite premiered at New York's Museum of Modern Art, some derive from Open City, a collaboration with novelist Teju Cole and large ensemble. The trio energetically recasts everything it touches. "Hood" is a tribute to Detroit techno pioneer Robert Hood. On "Work", Vijay pays homage to his "number one hero", Thelonious Monk. "Countdown" reconsiders the classic Coltrane tune inside a rhythmic framework inspired by West African music. "Mystery Woman" is driven by compound pulses which owe a debt to South Indian drumming. Fast moving and quick-witted, the group has developed a strong musical identity of its own, with an emphasis on what Iyer calls "co-constructing", exploring all the dynamics of playing together. Yet the three players also get abundant solo space and, in a reflective moment at the album's centre, Iyer plays a moving version of Billy Strayhorn's "Blood Count" alone. Break Stuff, recorded in June 2014 at New York's Avatar Studio and produced by Manfred Eicher, is the third ECM release from Vijay Iyer. It follows the chamber music recording Mutations and the film-and-music project Radhe radhe: Rites of Holi. The Vijay Iyer Trio is touring in the US and Europe in February and March 2015.


19,95 €
Image Mutations
Vijay Iyer
Mutations

Vijay Iyer: piano, electronics; Miranda Cuckson: violin; Michi Wiancko: violin;
Kyle Armbrust: viola; Kivie Cahn-Lipman: violoncello

Mutations is Vijay Iyer's first album as a leader for ECM, and a recording that will widen perceptions of the pianist-composer's work. At its centre is "Mutations I-X", a composition scored for string quartet, piano, and electronics. A major piece built out of cells and fragments, it veers through many atmospheres, from moment to moment propulsive, enveloping, lyrical, luminescent, and strangely beautiful. Through thematic interactivity, the interweaving of acoustic and electronic sound-textures, and some decisive improvisational interventions in notated music, Vijay Iyer has created a multi-faceted suite whose very subject is change. Iyer gives a positive value to the concept of 'mutation' in this music, and variously appears in it as an interpreter of notated elements, as an improviser, and as "a sort of laptop artist, mixing in noise and different sounds," encouraging the transformative processes:

"A mutation process drives each of the suite's ten episodes," Iyer explains in the liner notes. "In some sections, minute variations or fluctuations in a recurring figure ultimately elicit a structural transformation; in other movements, real-time acts governed by competing directives yield an emergent, spontaneous order. These ten coexisting entities are linked either genetically or by a kind of symbiosis."

The suite is framed by three solo statements: "Spellbound and Sacrosanct, Cowrie Shells and the Shimmering Sea", a solo piano reading of one of Iyer's early compositions, and "Vuln, Part 2" and "When We're Gone", pieces created in summer 2013. The newer compositions put the piano in counterpoint with electronically generated rhythms and textures which extend the aura of the suite. The arc of the whole album is a journey over changing terrain.

Mutations was recorded at New York's Avatar Studio in September 2013, with Manfred Eicher as producer, and casts new light on Iyer's creative range. In recent seasons Vijay's personal approach to jazz and improvising has resonated with both press and the public, and multiple poll wins and awards including, most recently, a MacArthur Foundation fellowship, have raised his international profile. Yet important aspects of his work have remained undocumented on disc. Over the last ten years Iyer has written music for chamber ensembles of various formations, much of which "involves different approaches to improvisation as well as notation. I'm happy to have this chance to let it be heard alongside other work I have been doing that's more in a jazz vein, or more connected to the jazz community."

For Iyer working with 'classical' instrumentation is less a departure than a continuation. "I studied violin for 15 years and played in string quartets and orchestras. The sound of the string quartet has been in my head for as long as I can remember. Some of 'Mutations I-X' was written on violin, some of it on piano, some of it on the computer." I also wanted to put a certain amount of agency in the musician's hands to get them feeling like they could stir things at times and contribute something to the musical landscape. Basically to help them to feel like it was theirs as much as it was mine." A key question here and in other works of Iyer's: "How do you set people free inside the form that you've created?"

"Mutations I-X" was written and premiered in 2005 and has been rebuilt and effectively revised with each subsequent performance, by "working with the same notated elements but pushing the real time element more and more." At Avatar the musicians "had a kind of a breakthrough, particularly apparent in 'Movement VII', which itself is a kind of sculpted, open improvisation. The string players are given a set of instructions and what I call a gesture palette, a palette of notated material that they can draw from spontaneously. They can dip into and grab a fragment of it and interpret it. So, what I decided to do in these final moments when I was with them in the studio was to do a take where - instead of using that one page of notation - I used the entire piece as a sort of palette. All the material that they had been playing constantly for that period was now in their heads and in their bodies and they could express it in different ways, incorporate it into the active listening, and build something with it. It was great to hear and experience that, because it became something new that I didn't even foresee."
*
Vijay Iyer was born in Albany, New York. He studied mathematics and physics at Yale, and received an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in the cognitive science of music from the University of California, Berkeley. He has been on faculty at Manhattan School of Music, New York University, and the New School, and is the Director of The Banff Centre's International Workshop in Jazz and Creative Music, in Alberta, Canada. In January 2014 he joined the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University as the first Franklin D. and Florence Rosenblatt Professor of the Arts.

Iyer's many musical collaborators have included Steve Coleman, Wadada Leo Smith, Roscoe Mitchell, Butch Morris, George Lewis, Amina Claudine Myers, William Parker, Graham Haynes, Rudresh Mahanthappa, Rez Abbasi, Craig Taborn, Ambrose Akinmusire, Liberty Ellman, Steve Lehman, Matana Roberts, Tyshawn Sorey, Miya Masaoka, Pamela Z, John Zorn, Mari Kimura, DJ Spooky, Karsh Kale, and Talvin Singh. He has also worked with poets Mike Ladd, Amiri Baraka, Charles Simic, and Robert Pinsky. His compositions have been commissioned and performed by The Silk Road Ensemble, Ethel, Brentano String Quartet, JACK Quartet, the American Composers Orchestra, Hermès Ensemble, the International Contemporary Ensemble, and Imani Winds.

The ensemble heard on Mutations was assembled especially for this album. Miranda Cuckson has worked closely with composers including Elliott Carter, Boulez and Lachenmann. Her recording of Luigi Nono's "La lontananza nostalgica utopica futura" was named a Best Classical Recording of 2012 by the New York Times. Michi Wiancko's recent album releases include works by French composer/virtuoso Émile Sauret. She leads her own band Kon Michi. Kivie Cahn-Lipman is the founding cellist of the International Contemporary Ensemble. Violist Kyle Armbrust also plays with ICE, as well as with the Argento Ensemble and the Orchestra of the League of Composers. He has worked with Steve Reich, Elliott Carter and Charles Wuorinen, amongst other composers.

Vijay Iyer has recorded for labels including Asian Improv, Red Giant, Sunnyside, Savoy Jazz, Artist House, ACT and, most recently, Pi Recordings, which issued Holding It Down, a collaboration with Mike Ladd, setting poetry by veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. He first recorded for ECM in 2007, as a member of Roscoe Mitchell's Note Factory on the live album Far Side. Further ECM recordings with Vijay Iyer are in preparation.




19,95 €
Image Accelerando
Line Up:
vijay iyer / piano
stephan crump / bass
marcus gilmore / drums

produced by vijay iyer
recorded by chris allen, august 8-9, 2011 at sear sound, nyc

Surprising interpretations of traditional jazz, vintage and recent pop and funk tunes as well as Iyer's own infectious compositions: One of the most important pianists (The New Yorker) is back with his award-winning trio.


19,95 €
Image Accelerando (LP)
Surprising interpretations of traditional jazz, vintage and recent pop and funk tunes as well as Iyer's own infectious compositions: One of the most important pianists (The New Yorker) is back with his award-winning trio.

Line Up:
vijay iyer / piano
stephan crump / bass
marcus gilmore / drums

Recorded by chris allen, august 8-9, 2011 at sear sound, nyc

Accelerando is the follow-up to the Vijay Iyer Trio's Grammy-nominated Historicity - voted the No. 1 jazz album of 2009 around the world, including in the Downbeat critics' poll and by The New York Times

Pianist-composer Vijay Iyer's career has moved on an ever-accelerating arc over the past decade and a half, with the Indian-American artist earning a slew of international honors for his intrepid, multi-hued vision of 21st-century music. The latest chapter of this compelling story in contemporary jazz comes with the Vijay Iyer Trio's Accelerando, an album driven by the visceral, universal, intoxicating experience of rhythm. To be released in March 2012 by the German independent label ACT Music + Vision, Accelerando sees Iyer and his telepathic trio mates - bassist Stephan Crump and drummer Marcus Gilmore - go both deep and wide. They light up material that ranges from a brace of bold Iyer originals and pieces by great jazz composers to surprising interpretations of vintage and recent pop and funk tunes (Michael Jackson, Heatwave, Flying Lotus). Absorbing and infectious, this is jazz about not only the mind but the body.

With an advanced education in the hard sciences and his facility for complex music, Iyer could have been pegged as a "cerebral musician." But, he insists, "I actually experience music on a visceral level, the way most people do. Dance is just a bodily way of listening to music - it's a universal response. Jazz has always had some sort of dance impulse at its core. Bebop grew out of swing, which was a dance rhythm that became art music. I never want to lose that foundation of rhythmic communication in my work. That's what Accelerando is concerned with, that physical reality of music. For me, music is action."

Iyer has played with Memphis-bred bassist Stephan Crump since 1997 (when the pianist had first moved to New York City) and with Marcus Gilmore since 2003 (when the drummer, grandson of legendary jazz stickman Roy Haynes, was still attending New York's LaGuardia High School). The overwhelming response to the trio's 2009 album, Historicity, gave these musicians the opportunity to hone their group interaction in front of audiences around the world for two years. Iyer says: "We found more possibilities for spontaneous arrangement, textural and timbral extremes, and ensemble interplay. Our approach is less and less soloistic lately; it's more about developing a collective energy and momentum. When you hear us now, you can tell that it's us."

As very contemporary musicians, Iyer and his trio mates have a wide purview when it comes to a group approach to rhythm. "The way we come to rhythm is inspired by Bud Powell and Max Roach, Ahmad Jamal, Ellington and Monk, but it is not limited to that," he says. "There is the way James Brown approached it, and the way Jimi Hendrix, the Meters or Earth, Wind & Fire did it; there is the influence of Indian music, African music, Javanese gamelan. There is a whole world history of groove and pulse to draw on, and we do. When it comes to co-articulating a groove and thinking about the subtle dimensions of the beat, we aim to push and pull, to incorporate as many different ideas of orchestration, touch and dynamics as we can so that the rhythm breathes just like a body does."

The range of material on Accelerando - from Henry Threadgill to Michael Jackson to Iyer's compositions - is dizzying, wonderfully so. Among Iyer's original compositions, "Optimism" starts with a buoyant feel, but its crescendo "means that it builds way beyond anything hinted at by the opening material," Iyer explains. "It erupts from the light to the visceral, and we have to push ourselves physically to achieve that." The album's title track was initially the final movement of a suite Iyer wrote for choreographer Karole Armitage that was performed in Central Park. "I'm interested in tempo as a structural element," he says, "and this was an experiment to see if a constantly accelerating pulse could be the basis for dance. Luckily it worked. It was an amazing experience to write something for dancers and see it realized."

One of the highlights of Accelerando is Iyer's ingenious version of Threadgill's "Little Pocket-Sized Demons." The kaleidoscopic original version included two tubas, two guitars and a French horn. "It took a leap of imagination," Iyer says. "The original has this carnival vibe - polyphonic and surreal. It was hard to express all that counterpoint with just six hands. We used arco bass to thicken up the sound and spread the beat to evoke the tubas. Thread came to a rehearsal and gave us pointers, which was so inspiring. Like Monk, Henry has this composer's approach, but he is also someone, like Monk, who played in the church. You can hear that communicative power when he plays."

The album's version of the Michael Jackson ballad "Human Nature" is a trio extension of Iyer's solo piano arrangement heard on his 2009 album, Solo. "Interpreting a song like `Human Nature' is about telling your own story, like Miles did not long after the original," Iyer says. "That one or the Heatwave song or the Flying Lotus track were not obvious choices for a piano trio. But it's good for us to reach beyond ourselves to different musical approaches and even beyond our instruments. It leads to discovery - and that's the sound I really like."


24,95 €
Image Historicity (LP)
With Historicity Vijay Iyer, one of today's most celebrated and innovative US-American jazz artists, spectacularly redefines the classical notion of the piano trio.

Line Up:
Vijay Iyer - piano
Stephan Crump - bass
Marcus Gilmore - drums

Recorded by Joe Marciano at Systems Two, Brooklyn, NY on November 3, 2008 & March 31, 2009

What does jazz have to do with mathematics? More than one might think, says Vijay Iyer: "Music contains a lot of abstract thought and concepts like rhythm, chords and structures. It deals with numbers and quantities, which is what mathematics does. There was a time when mathematics was associated with traditions that did not differentiate between spirit and intellect, and that is exactly what music is for me. For me it's all about letting rational structures become intuitive." The American pianist with Indian roots knows what he is talking about: before becoming a musician he studied mathematics and physics at Yale and UC Berkeley. Only after saxophonist Steve Coleman offered him the position of pianist in his band in the mid 1990s, did Iyer decide to devote himself completely to music.

Since then, thanks to his intelligence and highly original creativity, the 37 year-old who studied violin and taught himself piano has had an impressive career that has made him one of the key figures in the contemporary American jazz scene. Upon arriving in New York a decade ago he quickly accumulated acclaim with his own formations, while also collaborating with some of today's most innovative artists, such as Amiri Baraka, Butch Morris, Roscoe Mitchell, and underground hip hop artist Mike Ladd. Iyer achieved international fame through years of collaborations with saxophonist Rudresh Mahanthappa, whom he met through Coleman, and who, like himself, is a first-generation American born of Indian parents. No fewer than twelve well-received albums have been recorded under his name thus far, and for several years now he has been the winner of numerous critic's polls (Iyer was twice voted the #1 Rising Star Jazz Artist and #1 Rising Star Composer in the Downbeat Magazine International Critics' Poll) and remarkable worldwide acclaim. Now the pianist has recorded his first CD exclusively for ACT. With Historicity, accompanied by Stephan Crump on bass and Marcus Gilmore on drums, he spectacularly redefines the classic notion of the piano trio.

Iyer's examination of the concept of historicity is the album's center of focus. It's about "being placed in the stream of history," he explains in the liner notes. "Without a doubt, it's the past that's setting us in motion." On Historicity, the pianist travels full circle from covers such as "Galang", by global hip-hop star M.I.A, to Stevie Wonder's "Big Brother", back to his own very early pieces ("Trident" and "Sentiment"). Not least due to the fact that the trio almost sounds like a single person, associations here succeed as never heard before. Or as Iyer himself put it: "Music, it seems, also connects -- carrying us smoothly across the tumult of experience, like water over rocks."

On Historicity, Iyer masterfully takes themes that have been occupying him throughout his career to new limits. One of these - catchword mathematics - is working with sounds that are infused with ciphers, symbols and codes. From the very outset, the first and title track bristles with mind boggling changes in rhythm and tempo, modal and serial sequences, and all manner of encryptions. Yet with Iyer this never sounds over-experimental; it retains full power and is listenable throughout. An excellent example is the tremendous, at once lyrical and abstract version of Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim's "Somewhere" from the musical "West Side Story".

The appearance of "West Side Story" which, put in modern terms, deals with the fate of immigrants, is surely not a coincidence. The quest for his own cultural identity and role in jazz, for familial roots and "American-ness", is another big theme in Iyer's work - one that led him early on to clear positions that extend beyond music. His last album, Tragicomic can be seen as a commentary on America's position at the end of the Bush administration. Historicity can also be seen as such a more up-to-the-minute commentary, appropriately more optimistic and future oriented. Iyer's work has always been steeped in a deep respect for the African-American blues- and jazz tradition (it isn't hard to recognize Thelonious Monk's influence in Iyer's keyboard technique and sense of melody, or the progressive developments of Andrew Hill, who also appears as a composer on Historicity's "Smoke Stack"); more uniquely his own however, is the alliance of contemporary jazz with the harmonic and rhythmically highly complex music of southern India. The incredible pull that this alliance can create, combined further with influences from contemporary hip hop and rock, is more than evident in the edgy and powerful "Galang". Iyer and his colleagues deliver a thunderingly percussive take on M.I.A.'s groundbreaking hit, using grand piano, bass, and drums to evoke tablas, synthesizers, and drum machines.


28,95 €
Image Tirtha
"Tirtha" effortlessly blends Indian musical traditions with contemporary jazz in this innovative trio setting, creating a musical conversation that stretches across both, continents and centuries.

Line Up:
vijay iyer / piano
prasanna / guitar, voice
nitin mitta / tabla

produced by tirtha

recorded august 11-12, 2008 at systems two, brooklyn, new york. engineer: joe marciano
mixed by scotty hard & vijay iyer at irritainment studios, brooklyn, new york, december 2008
mastered at turtletone studios, nyc by mike fossenkemper


19,95 €
Image Solo
"One of the best recordings of the year from one of our most exciting artists. [...] Solo is a terrific experience." (Downbeat)

Line Up:
Vijay Iyer / piano

Produced & arranged by Vijay Iyer
Co-produced by Cookie Marenco
Recorded May 16-17, 2010 and mixed May 18, 2010 at OTR studios, Belmont, California, Engineer: Cookie Marenco


19,95 €
Image Historicity
With Historicity, Vijay Iyer one of today's most celebrated and innovative US-American jazz artists spectacularly redefines the classical notion of the piano trio.

Line Up:
Vijay Iyer - piano
Stephan Crump - bass
Marcus Gilmore - drums

Recorded by Joe Marciano at Systems Two, Brooklyn, NY on November 3, 2008 & March 31, 2009
Assistant engineer: Max Ross
Mixed by Scotty Hard at Clawed Knobs, Brooklyn, NY on April 11 - 13, 2009
Mastered by Mike Fossenkemper at Turtletone Studio, New York, NY
Produced by Vijay Iyer


19,95 €
Image Andando el Tiempo
In time for Carla Bley’s 80th birthday on May 11, here is a new album by her outstanding trio with Andy Sheppard and Steve Swallow. This particular trio, in existence now for more than twenty years, has come to be the primary vehicle for conveying her compositions to the world. It’s a challenging task: “When I write for the trio,” Carla explained to the Detroit Metro-Times recently, “it’s really big band music reduced. I have to play way over my head and so do the guys. They have to take on a lot more than they would if I still had a big band.”
For listeners, one of the great pleasures of Carla’s small group work is hearing more of her unique piano playing. Where she once insisted that she was “one per cent player and ninety-nine per cent composer,” she allows that in recent years the player has been obliged to gain ground, inspired by the examples of Sheppard and Swallow. The subtle interaction of the players is well-served by the clarity of this new recording, and all three of them shine here – Carla with her spare, thoughtful playing, Swallow with his perfectly poised and elegant electric bass, Sheppard with his poignant saxophones.


24,95 €
Image Andando el Tiempo
In time for Carla Bley’s 80th birthday on May 11, here is a new album by her outstanding trio with Andy Sheppard and Steve Swallow. This particular trio, in existence now for more than twenty years, has come to be the primary vehicle for conveying her compositions to the world. It’s a challenging task: “When I write for the trio,” Carla explained to the Detroit Metro-Times recently, “it’s really big band music reduced. I have to play way over my head and so do the guys. They have to take on a lot more than they would if I still had a big band.”
For listeners, one of the great pleasures of Carla’s small group work is hearing more of her unique piano playing. Where she once insisted that she was “one per cent player and ninety-nine per cent composer,” she allows that in recent years the player has been obliged to gain ground, inspired by the examples of Sheppard and Swallow. The subtle interaction of the players is well-served by the clarity of this new recording, and all three of them shine here – Carla with her spare, thoughtful playing, Swallow with his perfectly poised and elegant electric bass, Sheppard with his poignant saxophones.


19,95 €
Image Trios
Carla Bley, Andy Sheppard and Steve Swallow revisit classic Bley compositions in an exceptional album recorded in Lugano last year by Manfred Eicher. Included here are spirited new versions of "Utviklingssang" and "Vashkar", and the suites "Les Trois Lagons", "Wildlife" and "The Girl Who Cried Champagne". Carla's robust tunes are vividly conveyed, all members solo compellingly, and the trio has never sounded better.
Trios is one of the outstanding jazz albums of the season and marks the first time that a new Carla Bley album has appeared on ECM itself (rather than the ECM-distributed WATT label, which has been her primary platform for 40 years).


19,95 €
Image Carla's Christmas Carols
5 AV 6 MÖJLIGA I BETYG I SVENSKA DAGBLADET

4 AV 5 MÖJLIGA I BETYG I DAGENS NYHETER

Avantgardisten Carla Bley gör en julskiva tillsammans med sin make, basisten Steve Swallow och en blåskvintett. Det är traditionella julsånger, hymner, jazzstandards som The Christmas song och några mer vildsinta kompositioner av Carla Bley själv. Musiken svänger förföriskt, gruppdynamiken är tät och blåset har emellanåt storbandets tyngd. Men blåsarna möts också i förtätade meningsutbyten där en serent sordinerad trumpet fräckt bryts mot brötiga trombontoner. Men även skirare stämningar spricker upp, som i Adams julsång och Away in a Manger där bas, klockspel och Carla Bleys piano lägger en grund för den vackra trumpetstämman."
(Svenska Dagbladet)

"Den här ovanligt sofisti­kerade julskivan sammanför traditionell helgmusik och klassiker som "Jingle bells" med en av jazzvärldens mest personliga kompositörer och arrangörer. Som ofta med Carla Bley finns det humor med i bilden - ta bara skivans sköna titel - samtidigt som musiken hanteras med en känsla och kompetens som slår många påtagligt seriösa musiker ordentligt på fingrarna. Här är det Bley (på piano), basisten Steve Swallow och en blåskvintett som spelar. Inget slagverk alltså. Men jazzsvänget finns där ändå. Ibland framskjutet och drivande, men vanligare som ett subtilt moment inbyggt i arrange­mangen lika mycket som det är musikernas förtjänst. Bley är en mästare på det där; hur hon liksom förmår trotsa tidsaspekten och förena det förberedande arbetet med själva framförandet. Hör även Swallows sublima elbasspel på till exempel Bleys dråpliga "Hell's bells"."
(Dagens Nyheter)

Carla Bley: piano, celeste
Steve Swallow: bass, chimes

Partyka Brass Quintet
Tobias Weidinger: trumpet, flugelhorn (lead), glockenspiel Axel Schlosser: trumpet, flugelhorn (soloist), chimes Christine Chapman: horn Adrian Mears: trombone
Ed Partyka: bass trombone, tuba




19,95 €
Image Musique Mecanique
16,95 €
Image The Very Big Carla Bley Band
Carla Bley
The Very Big Carla Bley Band

Lew Soloff trumpet
Guy Barker trumpet
Claude Deppa trumpet
Steven Bernstein trumpet
Gary Valente trombone
Richard Edwards trombone
Fayyaz Virji trombone
Ashley Slater bass trombone
Roger Jannotta oboe, flute, clarinet, soprano saxophone
Wolfgang Puschnig alto saxophone, flute
Andy Sheppard tenor and soprano saxophones
Pete Hurt saxophone
Pablo Calogero baritone saxophone
Carla Bley piano
Karen Mantler organ
Steve Swallow bass
Victor Lewis drums
Don Alias percussion

United States
Strange Arrangement
All Fall Down
Who Will Rescue You?
Lo Ultimo

Five striking Bley compositions are featured here, including two extended works, "United States" and "All Fall Down". The lasting impression is one of unusual voicings, adventurous soloists, unconventional arranging touches, and dissonant shadings. "Delightfully quirky, chaotically dynamic, delicately impressionistic, buoyantly upbeat, and brashly bold." - Downbeat


16,95 €
Image Orchestra Jazz Siciliana

Orchestra Jazz Siciliana
Orchestra Jazz Siciliana Plays The Music Of Carla Bley

Nico Riina trumpet
Massimo Greco trumpet
Orchestra Jazz Siciliana trumpet
Faro Riina trumpet
Giovanni Guttilla trumpet
Salvatore Pizzo trombone
Salvatore Pizzurro trombone
Maurizio Persia bass trombone
Orazio Maugeri saxophone
Claudio Montalbano saxophone
Alessandro Palacino saxophone
Orchestra Jazz Siciliana saxophone
Antonio Pedone saxophone
Ignazio Garsia piano
Pino Greco guitar
Paolo Mappa drums
Sergiu Cammalleri percussion
Gary Valente trombone
Steve Swallow bass
Carla Bley arranger and conductor

440
The Lone Arranger
Dreams So Real
Baby Baby
Joyful Noise
Egyptian
Blunt Object


16,95 €
Image Appearing Nightly
GÖTEBORGS-POSTEN / ÅRETS BÄSTA 2008

LIRA / ÅRETS BÄSTA 2008 ENLIGT MAGNUS ERIKSSON

4 AV 5 MÖJLIGA I BETYG I UPSALA NYA TIDNING

EN AV ÅRETS BÄSTA SKIVOR 2009 ENLIGT UNO OHLSSON PÅ NORRKÖPINGS TIDNINGAR

"Carla Bley är en snabbverkande vitamininjektion oavsett om hon spelar med en mindre grupp eller som här med storband. Hennes arrangemang och kompositioner följer inga ingrodda konventioner utan sprudlar av spontanitet och oförvägen upptäckarglädje. Man blir glad till sinnes när hon släpper loss sin energi och eggar fram bandet. Det går hem och det gjorde det till max två kvällar på jazzklubben New Morning i Paris 2006. Så till den milda grad att applåderna aldrig ville upphöra efter slutnumret, Ray Nobles I Hadn´t Anyone Till You."
(DIG)

Earl Gardner, Lew Soloff, Giampaolo Casati, Florian Esch:trumpets; Beppe Calamosca, Gary Valente, Gigi Grata, Richard Henry: trombones; Roger Jannotta: soprano and alto saxophones, flute; Wolfgang Puschnig: alto saxophone, flute; Andy Sheppard: tenor saxophone; Christophe Panzani: tenor saxophone; Julian Arguelles: baritone saxophone; Carla Bley: piano, conductor; Karen Mantler: organ; Steve Swallow: bass; Billy Drummond: drums

When I was young, big bands appeared regularly at jazz clubs in New York City. By working as a cigarette girl at Birdland or checking coats at Basin Street or the Jazz Gallery, I was able to hear Count Basie and many other great bands nightly. The clubs were dark and smoky. People would order drinks and talk and laugh between sets. The music was sophisticated and hard-swinging.

The music I wrote for this album was inspired by the atmosphere of nightclubs in the 1950s. It began when I was commissioned to write and perform a big band composition for the 2005 Monterey Jazz Festival. Looking for a starting point, I immediately thought of "The Black Orchid", a nightclub in Monterey where I taken a job as a pianist when I was seventeen. The piano had a bar built around it, and soldiers from the nearby military base would sit there and listen to me play standards. Often one of them would request a favorite song, but I had a very small and carefully arranged repertoire and wouldn't play anything I didn't like and couldn't fake anything I didn't know. It was my first and last job as a lounge pianist. I worked some memories of those early days (and late nights) into the piece I was writing for the festival. I called it "Appearing Nightly at the Black Orchid" and titled its four sections as though they were taking place in a nightclub: "40 On/ 20 Off" "Second Round", "What Would You Like To Hear?" and "Last Call".

I was very happy with the way the piece turned out and thought it would be interesting to write more music related to that era for an upcoming big band tour. I tried to postpone staring at the blank page, which is how my composition process always begins, by writing new arrangements of songs by my favorite Tin Pan Alley composers. But the best of those songs didn't need anything added to them so, since I wasn't interested in the songs that could have used some help, I resorted to writing original music and waited for a grand scheme to emerge.

The next piece I came up with contained a two-bar quote from a Gershwin song. It didn't come until the very end of the piece and wasn't intentional, but it was an encouraging sign. I felt I should use part of Gershwin's title, so I named the piece "Someone to Watch".

Then I got lucky and started writing a melody so similar to an old chestnut by Ray Noble that I made the piece into an arrangement of his song. Once again I decided to use only part of its title and called it "Till You". I seemed to have no control over which standards I ended up choosing; they chose me.

A pending commission to write a piece for the Orchestra Jazz della Sardegna came through, and I had to turn my attention away from my "Appearing Nightly" tour. Their festival was going to be called Dinner Music and they requested that the music I write for them be related to food in some way. I thought that was interesting but I couldn't figure out how music could sound like food. I thought about possible sound effects like forks hitting plates, chewing or burping noises, and briefly wondered if I could write a plausible 'sweet and sour' piece with 'bitter' undertones and a 'salty' ending. But nothing 'jelled' and this idea soon became 'stale'. Since I had 'nothing on my plate' I decided to 'cool it' and returned to the search for references to American popular songs.

The previous year I had written a melody with a phrase in the middle that sounded suspiciously like the title phrase of "Pretty Baby". I had changed the notes in that phrase, then abandoned the melody because it no longer sounded good to me. Now that I needed to find references to standards, I took it off the shelf, put the original phrase back in (it sounded good again) and turned it into a big band arrangement. At the end I blatantly used a whole four-bar melody "Greasy Gravy". Aha! A food title as well as a popular song!

The finished piece wasn't very long and didn't have enough weight to it, so I knew it was only the first half of the music I would present to the Sardinian band.

Luckily, the best was yet to come. I consider "Awful Coffee",* the second half, to be my crowning achievement. A resistant problem spot in the melody was solved by overhearing a rooster crowing at his hens. I used that sound wherever I needed it in the piece, justified by the fact that chicken is a common food. But that wasn't all. During one chorus I was able to quote six different songs with food references: "Salt Peanuts", "You're the Cream in My Coffee", "Watermelon Man", "Life is Just a Bowl of Cherries", "Hey Pete, Let's Eat More Meat", and "Tea for Two".** This more than qualified the piece for inclusion in both the "Appearing Nightly" and "Dinner Music" programs.

I was determined to record the music live in a nightclub. It had to be recorded during our European summer tour and the club had to be big. One place came immediately to mind. We had played the New Morning in Paris regularly and our audience there had always been large and enthusiastic. One phone call and it was ours for two nights toward the end of the tour. For a moment I imagined my band coming to work wearing matching jackets and bowties. I could sweep my hair up and put on a sparkling cocktail dress. We could hire a blues singer. I would smile sweetly at the audience and dedicate a song to the little boy and his father in the front row. Between sets we would drink highballs and smoke cigarettes. Then I came to my senses. It's hard enough to get the musicians out of their jogging pants and sneakers. The highballs might have a few takers, but cigarettes? Any reference to the past would have to be delivered musically.

We hired Gerard de Haro of Studio La Buissonne to record the two nights. He took over the club's dressing room and turned it into a control room full of machines and engineers. It was impossible to get separation between the instruments, so no mistakes could be fixed, but in return we got an intimate sound with lots of atmosphere. It was just what I had envisioned for the album; we couldn't bring back the past, but this was a chance to pay our respects to the wonderful big bands and great American songwriters that dominated American popular music in the first half of the 20th century.
(Carla Bley)


19,95 €
Image Lost Chords find Paolo Fresu, The
Jazzman, Choc du mois
Classica-Répertoire, L'événement jazz du mois


"This is a record alive with patient intelligence. Carla Bley's newish quartet, the Lost Chords, is a reduction of her more commonly known Big Band, and here it's in no hurry; it just saunters gloriously through her original music. ...
Mr. Sheppard and Mr. Fresu sound right together, meshing their lines and improvisations, making elegant compound colors. But they don't detach from the band. They serve a larger mood and purpose, one that extends from Thelonious Monk's ballads and some of Steve Lacy's most beautiful and temperate later music. It's serene, urbane and full of its own secrets."
(The New York Times)

"While trying to write new music for The Lost Chords, I kept hearing a trumpet. It wasn't the usual trumpet sound I hear when I write for Big Band. It was elegant and eloquent. Earthy yet ethereal. Suddenly I could hear this beautiful sound leaking out of Andy' Sheppard's headphones. I realized it was Paolo Fresu." Carla Bley did the obvious thing, inviting the Italian trumpeter to join her group for a recording at Gérard de Haro's Studios La Buisonne near Avignon, and on the European tour to mark its release.

Paolo Fresu, trumpet, flugelhorn
Andy Sheppard, soprano and tenor saxophones
Carla Bley, piano
Steve Swallow, bass
Billy Drummond, drums

Recorded May 2007


19,95 €
Image Selected Recordings
This collection contains samples from almost all of my life's musical efforts, starting with recent albums and going back, with a few selections from ECM releases of my work by other artists, to the early sixties." This is the :rarum disc that reaches the furthest into history as Carla's "Ictus" is played by Jimmy Giuffre's 1961 trio: this was music that laid the groundwork for the "chamber jazz" ECM would later explore more extensively. There is music with the Jazz Composer's Orchestra and with the Liberation Music Orchestra, and with Carla's large and small ensembles as documented on WATT, and no shortage of star soloists.


19,95 €
Image Looking For America
With the aid of a powerful telescope and a healthy dose of irony the indefatigable Ms Bley goes looking for the heart and soul of America. New compositions, infected by a "patriotic virus", are played with verve by an almost all-American Big Band. Featured soloists include Gary Valente, Lew Soloff and willing European confederates Andy Sheppard and Wolfgang Puschnig.

Lawrence Feldman, soprano and alto saxophones, flute
Wolfgang Puschnig, alto saxophone (solos), flute
Andy Sheppard, tenor saxophone (solos)
Craig Handy, tenor saxophone
Gary Smulyan, baritone saxophone (solos)
Earl Gardner, trumpet
Lew Soloff, trumpet (solos)
Byron Stripling, trumpet
Giampaolo Casati, trumpet
Jim Pugh, trombone
Gary Valente, trombone (solos)
Dave Bargeron, trombone
David Taylor, bass trombone
Karen Mantler, organ, glockenspiel
Carla Bley, piano, conductor
Steve Swallow, bass
Billy Drummond, drums
Don Alias, percussion
Robert Routch, French horn
Danilo Zeni, siren



19,95 €
Image To Be Continued
19,95 €
Image Vossabrygg
Preis der deutschen Schallplattenkritik, Bestenliste 2/2006

"Vossabrygg, a hypnotic fusion concerto recorded live in 2003, is determinedly modern in its dark magic and angel song. Hectic dance-floor electronics put the gas in "Incognito Traveller"; sampled choir and strings warm the melancholy of "Hidden Chapter" like rays of winter sun. It is also a jolt and joy to hear Rypdal ... explode with heavy manners in "You're Making It Personal", slicing the air with his guitar like it's an ice sword."
(Rolling Stones)

"Rypdal, never one to pay homage and leave it at that, embraces the advances in technology with the inclusion of keyboards wizard Ståle Storløkken... But the biggest development is the inclusion of Rypdal's son, Marius, handling the electronics and samples ... Rypdal compositions are poised but lyrical, using silences to create an other worldly sense of mystery. On the evidence of Vossabrygg, Rypdal is at the top of his game."
(Jazz Review)

"This is no facile nod to the past. Rypdal's own son is at hand to lay down crackling electronic interludes, so that we suddenly hand brake turn through drum'n'bass textures, while Rypdal himself, for all his love of McLaughlin, is very much his own man. It's increasingly rare to hear him on record playing in this kind of 'jazz' context ... so the looser forms of Vossabrygg are a welcome space to stretch out in his sky-soaring style. A welcome run out from the great guitar man, but this is one brew he's particularly whipped up for Mikkelborg whose haunting trumpet is the key sound throughout."
(Jazzwise)

Terje Rypdal, guitar
Palle Mikkelborg, trumpet, synthesizer
Bugge Wesseltoft, electric piano, synthesizer
Ståle Storløkken, Hammond organ, electric piano, synthesizer
Marius Rypdal, electronics, samples, turntables
Bjørn Kjellemyr, electric and acoustic bass
Jon Christensen, drums
Paolo Vinaccia, percussion

Recorded April 2003



19,95 €
Image Crime Scene
LIRA GILLAR

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Terje Rypdal: electric guitar; Palle Mikkelborg: trumpet; Ståle Storløkken: Hammond B-3 organ; Paolo Vinaccia drums, sampling. The Bergen Big Band.

Recorded live at Bergen's Natjazz Festival in May 2009, "Crime Scene" is a powerful and exciting addition to Terje Rypdal's ECM discography. Although the Norwegian guitarist/composer has written often for orchestras or chamber ensembles - see, for instance, his "Undisonus", "Q.E.D.", "Double Concerto" and "Lux Aeterna" recordings -collaborations with jazz big band have less frequent.

Invited to write music for the Bergen Big Band, however, Rypdal was intrigued firstly to find that the two of the ensemble's sax players and also conductor/flutist Olav Dale doubled on bass clarinet: "Three bass clarinets! That straight away offers unusual sound-colour and textural possibilities for a composer". He was also impressed to learn that the Bergen musicians had just issued an album of variations on John Coltrane's "Meditations" ("Meditations on Coltrane", Grappa Records, 2007), a progressive choice for jazz big band. Late period Coltrane, and "Meditations" in particular, had been one of Rypdal's own entry points into jazz improvising in the 1960s ("the music spoke to me much more directly than bebop did") and he was pleased to revisit this formative influence in his composition.

Thus, where the "Vossabrygg" album (recorded 2003, released 2006) was in part a tribute to the Miles Davis of "Bitches Brew", the plot of "Crime Scene" incorporates its salutes to Coltrane and Pharoah Sanders and the ecstatic glossolalia of their saxophones. Rypdal's writing for the horns and reeds sends the horms and reeds into the overtone range for long stretches. The Bergen musicians respond to the challenge with real commitment.

A Rypdal small group - his partners Ståle Storløkken and Paolo Vinaccia from the Skywards trio plus old comrade Palle Mikelborg - are flanked by the massed Bergen players, conducted by Olav dale, in a quasi concerto grosso format, a band inside a bigger band. There is passionate playing both at the centre and on the edges of the music and periodic bursts of flat-out rock jamming by Rypdal and his team, including incendiary exchanges between Terje and Storløkken, the latter perhaps best known for his contributions to noise/electro/improv band Supersilent. When the smoke clears, Mikkelborg and Rypdal evoke the spatial/textural skyscapes of their early collaborations ("Waves", "Descendre"); a good deal of Rypdal's musical history is referenced here.

The shards of film and radio-play dialogue scattered through the album, collected and collaged by Paolo Vinaccia, add a Noir-ish flair to the work, prompting Rypdal to add crime procedural titles to the music's individual movements, though he stresses that connections between the subheadings and the music can only be loosely interpreted.

The Bergen premiere of "Crime Scene" was very well-received by the media. US webzine Allboutjazz compared Rypdal's use of texture and sound colour to György Ligeti's, and also observed, that "as fine a piece as 'Vossabrygg' was, Crime Scene surpassed it in scope and performance." In Norway, NRK Radio's review noted that "Rypdal evokes outrageously exciting sounds from the big band set up. The hour-long piece is structured freedom. The tenorists Ole Jakob Hystad and Zontan Vinczes echo sixties Coltrane. And seventies-jazz rock is evoked when Palle Mikkelborg attacks. Through the pieces boil sound sequences from dramatic crime- and mafia flicks. On top soars Rypdal´s ecstatic guitar playing - we have in fact never heard him better."

The artistic and public success of the Rypdal/Bergen Big Band combination has encouraged the participants to seek new opportunities to take the collaboration further. They will be performing the "Crime Scene" music at several major festivals in the months ahead, including Balejazz in Norway (May 7), and the Moers New Jazz Festival in Germany (May 21).


19,95 €
Image 3CD-BOX: Odyssey - In Studio & In Concert
Discs One and Two:
Terje Rypdal: electric guitar, synthesizer, soprano saxophone; Torbjørn Sunde: trombone; Brynjulf Blix: organ; Sveinung Hovensjø: bass guitar; Svein Christiansen: drums.

Disc Three:
Terje Rypdal: electric and acoustic guitars, keyboards, soprano saxophone; Brynjulf Blix: synthesizer, organ, electric piano; Sveinung Hovensjø: bass guitar; Svein Christiansen drums. Swedish Radio Jazz Group, conducted by Georg Riedel and Terje Rypdal

Terje Rypdal's "Odyssey: In Studio & In Concert" is a very special release. It includes not only the complete "Odyssey" album (recorded 1975) on CD for the first time (restoring the long track "Rolling Stone" to its rightful place), but also a full disc of previously unreleased material on which Terje Rypdal's Odyssey band is augmented by the Swedish Radio Jazz Group in a 1976 live performance of Rypdal's suite "Unfinished Highballs".

In the liner notes, Rypdal tells John Kelman, "Odyssey was my first major band, and the music was different too because, more and more, I was writing music in two layers - one thing going on with the bass and drums, and rubato playing layered over the top. It was the first time I'd to connect with a band, more about writing together with improvisation. It was a challenge; I was trying to bring together the composer and the player." Rypdal's ideas of form and freedom are beautifully sculpted and registered in Manfred Eicher's widescreen production.

John Kelman: "The release of 'Odyssey' in its entirety, along with the significant revelations of 'Unfinished Highballs', comes when Rypdal is in a period of renewed creativity and activity, making it especially relevant as a more complete document of how confluence, at an early stage in his career, ultimately led to the further multidisciplinary junctions that keep his music as fresh and relevant as he approaches 65."

"I'm very happy this is coming out", Rypdal says, "because I've been asked, before 'Crime Scene' was released, if I'd written anything for big band. I think this is a very important part of my career: I'm very glad "Rolling Stone" is finally coming out; and 'Unfinished Highballs' will be a surprise to a lot of people. That's what I really like about this box - that it can accomplish both at the same time."


33,95 €
Image Melodic Warrior
Terje Rypdal, guitar
The Hilliard Ensemble

Bruckner Orchester Linz
Dennis Russell Daviesm conductor

Wroclaw Philharmonic Orchestra
Sebastian Perloswski, conductor

Two large compositions constitute one of Terje Rypdal's most adventurous albums. The title piece, a 45 minute epic, was commissioned by the Hilliard Ensemble and recorded at the Brucknerhaus Linz in 2003 with the British vocal group and the Bruckner Orchestra under Dennis Russell Davies. The Hilliards sing texts drawn from Native American poetry, from Chippewa, Navajo, Pima, and Papago sources, and Rypdal's sustained electric guitar lines soar melodically and dramatically above the strings' broad planes of sound. "And The Sky Was Coloured With Waterfalls And Angels", meanwhile, documents the premiere of Terje's op. 97. Composed in 2009, inspired by Cannes' International Fireworks Festival and recorded with the Wroclaw Philharmonic, it is a darkly-expressive piece of, concentrated, explosive power.



19,95 €
Image Waves (LP)
Terje Rypdal Electric Guitar, RMI Keyboard Computer, ARP Synthesizer
Palle Mikkelborg Trumpet, Flugelhorn, RMI, Tac Piano, Ringmodulator
Sveinung Hovensjø 6-String Electric Bass, 4-String Electric Bass
Jon Christensen Drums, Percussion

24,95 €
Image Waves
19,95 €
Image Ante Lucem
Ante Lucem, a powerful work for jazz quintet and symphony orchestra by Finnish pianist/harpist/composer Iro Haarla, was commissioned by the Norrlands Opera Symphony Orchestra and its leader Marco Feklistoff and premiered at the Umeå Jazz Festival in October 2012. It was recorded at the Concert Hall of NorrlandsOperan in Umeå, and the album is drawn both from the premiere concert and from sessions on the following days. Ante Lucem was subsequently mixed in Stockholm by Torbjörn Samuelsson, Manfred Eicher and Iro Haarla.

In a review of the Umeå Festival for All about Jazz, John Kelman pointed out that “what distinguished [Ante Lucem] from other symphonic collaborations was its remarkable integration. This was not a case of alternating passages for orchestra and quintet, though there were plenty of feature spots for Haarla’s group (…) Instead this suite, intended to reflect on that quiet time of day between moonset and sunrise, traversed a great range of imagery and emotion…Haarla’s writing moved from maelstrom-like turbulence to deeper melancholy and, ultimately, that gentle silence-approaching beauty which evokes so much promise at the start of each and every day. Whether it was more dramatic turns with the full orchestra or breakdowns into smaller subsets, it was an evocative and provocative performance.”


19,95 €
Image Vespers
Iro Haarlan suomalais-norjalainen kvintetti uudella tunnelmallisella albumilla "Vespers". Haarlan johtamassa Iro Haarla Quintet -yhtyeessä soittaa viisi uraaurtavaa pohjoismaista jazzmuusikkoa (Mathias Eick, Trygve Seim, Ulf Krokfors & Jon Christensen), joista jokainen kuuluu levy-yhtiö ECM:n valioartistien joukkoon.

Iro Haarlan edellinen, viisi vuotta sitten samojen artistien kanssa äänitetty ECM-albumi "Northbound" (ECM 1918) herätti huomiota taiteellisella tyylikkyydellään ja esteettisellä sointimaailmallaan.
Uutuuslevyn ballaadit toimivat musiikillisesti loogisena ja tunnistettavana jatkona aikaisemman albumin materiaalille.

Ääninäytteitä uudesta levystä sekä lisätietoja oheisen linkin kautta: http://player.ecmrecords.com/haarla

19,95 €
Image Northbound
Iro Haarla (piano, harppu)
Trygve Seim (saksofonit)
Mathias Eick (trumpetti)
Uffe Krokfors (kontrabasso)
Jon Christensen (rummut)

Iro Haarlan ECM-levytys "Northbound" on pohjoismaisen jazzmusiikin parhaimmistoa. Albumin nimi viittaakin pohjoiseen ulottuvuuteen. Levy tarjoaa Iro Haarlan runollista pianotekstuuria sekä persoonallisia jazzsävellyksiä, jotka ovat eduksi muille jo aiemmista ECM-levyistä tutuiksi tulleille artisteille.

19,95 €
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